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“I loved being a part of the show,” Weaver said. “It was really funny, but I wasn’t expecting to put my fingers up a chicken’s butt.”

Gotta love school news.


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I recently chatted with the guys at Ellusionist.com, a web site for magicians to talk about my ideas about the use of comedy in my magic.

You can hear the podcast HERE.

From Ellusionist.com:

Michael Kent is a master at getting laughs. His smartass personality gives his magic an edge that keeps fans engaged, impressed and energized. He is the life of the party during his shows, and that’s no accident. He figures out exactly what kind of reactions he wants, then sets his performance accordingly.

ellusionist.com Next Level

Thanks to Ellusionist.com for asking me to do the interview. Feel free to comment on the story!

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Here’s an interview I gave to BG News to help promote my show there tomorrow.

BG News Q&A

Read the Q&A at BG News.

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by | Categories: Reviews & Press | No Comments

The Magic Newswire is a blog/podcast for magicians.  There you will see interviews with entertainers like David Blaine, Lance Burton, Neil Patrick Harris and many others.  I was recently interviewed about playing colleges and about my recent trip to Korea.

You can listen to the interview via flash HERE.

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Ellusionist.com, a web site for young magicians to learn stuff, has written about me on their blog.

Ellusionist Logo

“It was an incredible 15-day tour on 10 US Army bases,” Kent said. “I was doing college shows and I loved doing them, but I wanted to give back more. These people were so appreciative it was really fulfilling and it became difficult to leave each night.”

Read the full text here.

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Originally Posted on 4/2/08

Source: http://www.cm-life.com

Kent entertains with magical comedy

By: Robert D. Pore

Issue date: 3/31/08 Section: News

The night ended with a story about childhood misery, a shower of confetti and applause.

Comedian and magician Michael Kent finished his Friday act at Moore Hall’s Townsend Kiva by telling a story about how his dad had ruined his childhood with his explanation of where stars came from.

As he finished, confetti magically appeared from his hand.

Kent parodied fellow magician David Copperfield’s habit of telling sad stories about his childhood.

“You don’t see magicians who make fun of magic very often, so I’m glad we could bring someone like Michael to CMU,” said Christa Smalligan, Fremont senior and Program Board member.

Smalligan’s favorite part of the act was the finale.

“I really enjoyed the confetti – I think because of the way he was poking fun at everyone who’s so serious about it,” Smalligan said.


Media Credit: John Ehlke
Comedian and magician Michael Kent begins the show with a quick card trick in Moore Hall’s Townsend Kiva on Friday night. Kent asked audience members to look at a card and he would tell the members of the audience which card they looked at in the deck.
[Click to Enlarge]

Midland freshman Cody J. Bartow also enjoyed the end of the show.

“I liked the last one,” Bartow said. “This show exceeded expectations.”

In addition to telling stories, Kent also involved the audience in his act.

For one trick, Kent brought Macomb freshman Joseph Dombrowski and asked for a $20 bill, which he then put in an envelope and shredded it.

“I was actually kind of mad, because I saw pieces of my 20 come out of the shredder,” Dombrowski said.

But Dombrowski’s worries were premature.

After initially pretending he had made a mistake, Kent then opened a series of boxes within boxes and revealed the $20 bill, intact and complete with Dombrowski’s handwriting on it from before it had gone through the shredder.

“It was weird, because it was my same exact writing,” Dombrowski said.

After getting his money back, Dombrowski held no grudges.

Kent says this is part of why he does his magic as a comedy act.

“The way that I feel about it is that some people don’t like to be fooled, and the way I do magic helps people to forget they’re being fooled,” Kent said. “I just wanted to be myself onstage because I’m not a dramatic person.”

news@cm-life.com

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Originally Posted on 2/26/08

Source: Northeastern News
By Sean Leviashvili

Michael Kent worked his magic as he performed a stand-up routine at afterHOURS Wednesday.

As part of BananAwareness Week, Travis Weisberger, showcases chair for the Council for University Programs, arranged for Kent to perform at Northeastern. Kent is known for putting his own spin on a series of magic tricks by interacting with the audience and treating his act as a comedy routine, a task he admits can be a challenge.

“I started doing comedy in college,” Kent said. “It is the most difficult thing I’ve ever done. A comic only has his personality to use [on stage], and I try to bring it to the magic tricks and give them personality.”

Performing in front a crowd of about 200 people, Kent brought forth a series of magic tricks that made audience members like Yuliya Sysevich, a sophomore marketing major, wonder what his secret was.

Syesevich was initially called to the stage when Kent asked for an audience member with “excellent intuition.” To assist Kent with a trick involving a broken glass bottle, four inflated paper bags and Kent’s left hand, Syesevich had to guide him through a step-by-step process in eliminating the bags. One contained the glass bottle with the sharp side up.

With each elimination, Kent crushed the bag with his hand.

“Remember, I’m using my hands here,” Kent said to Syesevich. “If you screw this up, it’s the end of my career and social life as well.”

The only bag Syesevich did not select concealed the jagged glass bottle.

“All of his tricks were really surprising,” Syesevich said. “With each one I was like ‘Wow, how did he do that?'”

Syesevich had an intuitive hunch that everything would turn out all right, but other students, including Grace Turnbull, a middler behavioral neuroscience major, were not as confident.

“I was terrified when he was smashing those glasses,” Turnbull said.

The tricks, along with the jokes and sarcasm, continued for about an hour as Kent brought Nani Stoick, a middler music industry major, to the stage, only to have her volunteer her $100 bill for a trick. After writing her name on the bill, Stoick placed it in an envelope and left the rest up to Kent and his magic. She watched as Kent pretended to shred the bill.

After five minutes of brewing curiosity, Kent returned Stoick’s money to her, retrieving it from a small metal box.

“For a split second I was worried,” Stoick said. “I had a feeling it would be in the box but I have no idea how it got there. I was impressed.”

As Kent’s routine continued, he left the audience pondering the question: what came first, the chicken or the egg? In this case, it was the chicken – a rubber one. With a volunteer from the audience, Kent conducted a card trick in which he managed to transfer a card selected by the audience member to a plastic egg inside a rubber chicken.

When Weisberger first saw this trick performed at the National Association for Campus Activities conference in November, he knew Kent would draw attention at Northeastern and arranged for him to perform.

“It was the chicken trick that sold us,” Weisberger said, “and his smart-ass personality.”

Prior to his performance, Kent eased audience members into his techniques by speaking with them at afterHOURS and promoting the event at the dining halls during the day. Making the audience comfortable and entertaining them is the priority, Kent said.

Whether it involves a rubber chicken, the chance of a bleeding palm or the money to pay for it, Kent said the most important thing is giving people a chance to enjoy themselves, rather than get frustrated, which Kent said is often the result of magic tricks.

“As a kid,” Kent said, “I was interested in magic and used it to compensate for my lack of a social life. I did magic in college to meet girls, and now I do it to pay the bills.”

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